8 Big Purchases That Usually Go Up in Value Over Time

INVESTING - SAVING FOR RETIREMENT
Putting your money into these items could be a smart decision over the long run.
Updated Aug. 24, 2023
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Trying to make a little extra cash? 

Some big yet simple purchases have a chance to increase in value with enough time. While nothing is guaranteed, investing in one of them now could prove to be a smart decision down the road. 

So, if you're looking for ways to build wealth, check out these eight investments that might bring you a good return in the future.

Stocks

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Stocks are some of the best long-term investments. History is no guarantee of future success. 

Still, millions of people who have invested in stocks in the past have grown their wealth over time. Going back to 1926, the S&P; 500 has returned an average of about 10% per year. 

Not sure where to start? Consider seeking the advice of a trusted financial advisor. Working with a professional can help you discover the right options for your life circumstances.

Real estate

LIGHTFIELD STUDIOS/Adobe family running to new house

Real estate has a great track record of increasing in value as the years roll along. The median sales price of a home in the U.S. has increased from $63,700 in 1980 to $467,700 in 2020, according to the St. Louis Federal Reserve. 

People will always need a place to live, meaning houses, apartment complexes, and condos should remain in demand in the future.

Property values don’t always go up. In rare periods — such as now — they can decline in some markets. But the vast majority of the time, real estate becomes more valuable over longer periods of time.

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Land

nikkytok/Adobe land for sale sign against trimmed lawn

Like real estate, there’s a limited amount of land in the world. Unlike real estate, it is not easy to create more land.

Land doesn’t always go up in value. But as a general rule, it's likely to either become more valuable or hold its value relatively well over time. 

For example, over the past 20 years, farmland in the U.S. has increased at an average annual rate of 12.24%, according to AcreTrader. In other words, $10,000 invested in farmland in 2000 would now be worth $96,149.

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Fine wine

Africa Studio/Adobe red wine pouring into wine glass

Not all fine wine is a good investment, so it helps to be a dedicated, devoted wine connoisseur who knows how to find the best wines. If that sounds like you, the odds are much better that you'll choose a wine that increases in value.

The average annual return on wine has been about 8% over the past 16 years, according to RareWine Invest.

Pro tip: If you want to invest in fine wines — or anything else on this list — you'll need some money. Consider earning extra money on the side by getting a part-time job or starting a side hustle.

Education

arekmalang/Adobe asian college student

Some critics say an expensive education is no longer a good investment. However, research has found that people with higher levels of education still earn larger average annual salaries.

Moreover, statistics show that those with college degrees have a higher quality of life in other ways, ranging from being more likely to own a home to increasing their odds of having solid health insurance.

Not only is an education a solid investment in your career, but it can also boosts other facets of your life.

Luxury watches

Vladimir Zhupanenko/Adobe analogue street clock Rolex in golden case hanging on a wall

A recent Business Insider report noted that luxury watches from the likes of Rolex and Patek Philippe soared in value in 2022.

If you have an old Rolex or other luxury brand watch, it might be worth keeping it stored away for a while. Luxury watches have historically increased in value. In some periods, they do even better than precious metals and stocks. 

Major luxury watch brands typically increase prices 5%-10% a year, according to Yieldstreet.

Rare collectibles

Nigel/Adobe pile of child's building blocks in multiple colours

No, we aren’t talking about Beanie Babies or your old Disney VHS tapes, neither of which have increased as much in value as you might have hoped.

But other collectibles have soared in value. Take vintage Pokémon cards — some can sell for hundreds or even thousands of dollars. In 2022, YouTuber and boxer Logan Paul set a new record when he bought a Pikachu Illustrator card for $5.275 million.

Collectibles that occasionally sell for a boatload of cash include certain McDonald’s toys, some vintage unopened Lego sets, and a handful of Cabbage Patch dolls. Keep in mind, the more you know about what you're buying, the better your chances of making a smart decision.

Vintage handbags

15Studio/Adobe black leather Chanel bag

Unlike your typical functional bag from Old Navy or the Gap, luxury handbags are built to last for far longer than just a few years.

That is one key reason vintage handbags from luxury brands are a great investment. In terms of quality, the bags are meant to endure. As a result, their value tends to go up year after year.

Certain vintage handbags have increased even more in value than some luxury cars, according to a report in Eluxe Magazine.

For instance, some Chanel bags have exploded in value by nearly 100% in the last 10 years. Hermes Birkins bags have increased even more — 153% in a decade.

Bottom line

LIGHTFIELD STUDIOS/Adobe young couple counting money

Whether you have items around your house that you could sell for a profit or you’re working toward a degree, any of the items listed here could rise in value over the years. Of course, there are no guarantees. 

You won’t get rich overnight. But with time, you may build enough wealth to retire early or pursue another dream.

FinanceBuzz is not an investment advisor. This content is for informational purposes only, you should not construe any such information as legal, tax, investment, financial, or other advice.

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Author Details

Michelle Smith Michelle Smith has spent a decade writing for and about small businesses. She specializes in all things finance and has written for publications like G2 and SmallBizDaily. When she's not writing for work at her desk, you can usually find her writing for pleasure near large bodies of water.

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