How to Get Hyatt Suite Upgrades (Including with Points!)

Ready to book Hyatt suite upgrades? You now have the option to book them online with points.
Last updated Dec 15, 2021 | By Ben Walker | Edited By Becca Borawski Jenkins
Couple enjoying hotel breakfast in bed

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Like many major hotel chains, Hyatt offers a wide range of hotels to choose from, including over 1,000 properties across six continents. Each of the 20 Hyatt hotel brands provides a different selection of rooms, which could include both standard rooms and suites in some cases. And like most hotel guests — we want the suites!

But how do you get them? Apart from paying more money, Hyatt offers a few different ways to upgrade your room to a suite, including a new feature on their website that allows you to use points for suite upgrades. Let’s see how it works.

In this article

Hyatt suite upgrades: The basics

The Hyatt website recently gained some new functionality. It now allows you to upgrade your room to a suite with points — all through the online booking process. This is likely much easier than calling for most people and should be a welcome addition for Hyatt enthusiasts who like to book suites.

Previously, Hyatt had added the option to book suites online using points, which is different from being able to book suite upgrades online with points. Booking a suite with points lets you use points for the entire booking. Booking a suite upgrade lets you pay cash for a room and then use points for the upgrade.

Both of these new features give Hyatt customers more options as they’re browsing different Hyatt properties online.

How to upgrade to a Hyatt suite using points

Hyatt offers multiple options for booking suites, including:

  • Using points for a suite: World of Hyatt loyalty program members can book suites online using World of Hyatt points.
  • Using suite upgrade awards: Hyatt members can receive suite upgrade awards through milestone rewards and additional methods. These can be used for confirmed suite upgrades during the booking process. In addition, Hyatt Globalist (the highest World of Hyatt elite status) members could receive standard suite upgrades at check-in, if available.
  • Using points for a suite upgrade: Hyatt members can use points to book suite upgrades online.

If you want to book a suite upgrade using points, you have to be a World of Hyatt member. However, there’s no specific elite status requirement.

Certain Hyatt properties could have both standard and premium suites available for points upgrades. But keep in mind, suite upgrades are subject to availability and could differ between different Hyatt properties. For example, a Hyatt House wouldn’t likely have the same room options as a Park Hyatt.

Follow these steps to book a Hyatt suite upgrade online with points:

1. Navigate to Hyatt.com and enter the name of the hotel you want to book. Be sure to select the “Use Points” option and then click the “Find Hotels” button.

Hyatt Website Screenshot

2. Select the type of suite upgrade you want from the available options. You might have options for either a standard suite upgrade (cash + 6,000 points) or a premium suite upgrade (cash + 9,000 points) at the time of booking. If you don’t see suite upgrade options, you may have to adjust your dates or select a different property.

Hyatt Website Screenshot

3. Sign into your account and finish the booking process for your room.

Hyatt Website Screenshot

4. To compare the cash price of the same room (including the suite upgrade), go through the same booking process but don’t click on the “Use Points” option.

Hyatt Website Screenshot

In this example, at the Grand Hyatt New York, the cash price plus points upgrade would be $277.76 and 9,000 points. Using an accepted points valuation of 1.7 cents per point, that means 9,000 points would be worth about $153 (9,000 x $0.017 = $153). So your total value would be $430.76.

The regular paid rate for the same room on the same nights is $537.78, which is a difference of $107.02. This means you net some decent value by using points for your upgrade instead of cash.

How many points do you need for Hyatt suite upgrades?

If you want to book a Hyatt suite with points, you’ll typically pay around 60% more in points for a standard suite than for a regular room. If you want a premium suite, it’s double the number of points of a standard room at the same property.

Here’s how Hyatt breaks down how many points you need for award nights depending on the Hyatt hotel category:

Hyatt Website Screenshot

The number of points needed for a Hyatt suite upgrade is standard across all Hyatt properties. If you want to pay a standard cash rate for your room and then upgrade to a suite using points, you’ll need this many points per night:

  • Regency Club/Grand Club room: 3,000 points per night
  • Standard suite: 6,000 points per night
  • Premium suite: 9,000 points per night

Regency Club and Grand Hyatt Club rooms are unique to Hyatt Regency and Grand Hyatt properties. They’re typically considered a type of standard suite, but they have lower upgrade costs (in points) compared to other standard suites.

How to earn Hyatt points

If you want to use points for suite upgrades or free night awards at Hyatt properties, you first need to earn some World of Hyatt points. Fortunately, you have multiple ways to start earning, including using credit cards, staying at Hyatt hotels, and leveraging your World of Hyatt elite status.

Credit cards

If you compare credit cards, you’ll find a healthy mix of credit card offers to choose from. This includes travel cards, cashback cards, student cards, and more. But for the purposes of earning Hyatt points, you’ll want to stick with credit cards that earn points within the World of Hyatt program or that earn flexible rewards that can be transferred to World of Hyatt.

The best hotel credit card for Hyatt enthusiasts is the World of Hyatt Credit Card. This card offers 9X points per $1 spent at Hyatt hotels; 2X points per $1 spent on eligible travel, dining, and health purchases; and 1 point per $1 spent on everything else. With the generous sign-up bonus, you can earn up to 60,000 points: 30,000 points after spending $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months, plus an additional 30,000 points by earning 2 bonus points per $1 spent on purchases that earn 1 bonus point, up to $15,000 spent in the first 6 months. This card has a $95 annual fee.

For more details, check out our World of Hyatt Credit Card review.

If you're someone with a side hustle or a small business, you might also consider the World of Hyatt Business Credit Card. This card offers automatic Discoverist elite status as well as other perks. It also earns 9X points at Hyatt hotels (4X plus 5 base points as a World of Hyatt member); 2X on the top three spending categories each quarter (to 12/31/22, then the top two categories each quarter); 2X on fitness and gym memberships; and 1X on all other purchases.

For more info, check out our World of Hyatt Business Credit Card review.

Another option for earning Hyatt points is to earn Chase Ultimate Rewards points and then transfer them to your World of Hyatt account. These flexible rewards can be earned by using some of the best travel credit cards, including the Chase Sapphire Preferred.

The Sapphire Preferred offers a generous sign-up bonus of 60,000 points after spending $4,000 in the first 3 months. You also have the opportunity to earn 5X points on Lyft rides (through March 2022) and travel booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards; 3X points on eligible dining, select streaming services, and online grocery purchases; 2X points on travel; and 1X points per $1 on all other eligible purchases. All of your Chase points can be transferred to the World of Hyatt program since Hyatt is a Chase transfer partner. This card has a $95 annual fee.

For more details, check out our Chase Sapphire Preferred review.

The credit card issuer for both of these cards is Chase. American Express (Amex) cards don’t currently offer any ways to earn Hyatt points or rewards that can be transferred to the World of Hyatt program.

Hyatt hotel stays and more

World of Hyatt members can earn points on every hotel stay plus certain purchases, experiences, and other forms of travel. Here’s a breakdown of different ways you can earn points through the World of Hyatt program:

  • Hotel stays: Earn 5 points per $1 spent at Hyatt properties and certain partner properties, such as Small Luxury Hotels of the World and MGM Resorts.
  • Purchases at Hyatt properties: Earn 5 points per $1 spent on dining, spa, and other services at Hyatt properties.
  • Meetings and events: Earn 1 point per $1 spent (up to 50,000 points) for qualifying meetings and events at Hyatt properties.
  • Experiences: Earn up to 10 points per $1 spent on experiences with FIND, Lindblad Expeditions, and Exhale.
  • American Airlines AAdvantage: Earn 1 point per $1 spent when you link your World of Hyatt and American Airlines AAdvantage accounts and purchase qualifying American Airlines flights. This is in addition to earning AAdvantage miles.
  • Avis car rentals: Earn 500 points for qualifying car rentals with Avis.
  • Purchasing points: Purchase up to 55,000 points per year in increments of 1,000.

The best option on this list for earning points for most travelers is likely staying at Hyatt properties. As long as you’re a World of Hyatt member, you’ll earn at least 5 points per $1 spent. This rate doesn’t change depending on the hotel brand — you’ll earn the same rate at a Grand Hyatt versus a Hyatt Place.

World of Hyatt elite status

World of Hyatt statuses are separated into four tiers: Member, Discoverist, Explorist, and Globalist. A Hyatt Member is the lowest tier, while a Hyatt Globalist is the highest. If you progress through the tiers, you’ll gain access to increased benefits, including bonus points on eligible purchases.

Here’s how many points you can earn for each elite status tier:

Elite status Earning rate
Member 5 base points per $1 spent
Discoverist 5 base points per $1 spent + 10% bonus
Explorist 5 base points per $1 spent + 20% bonus
Globalist 5 base points per $1 spent + 30% bonus

Let’s say you stay one night at an Andaz hotel that costs $200 per night. As a Member, you would earn 1,000 points for your stay, which is valued at about $17 (1,000 x $0.017 = $17) when using a 1.7 cents per point valuation.

However, someone with Globalist status would earn the initial 1,000 points and then a 30% bonus of 300 more points, for a total of 1,300 points — which offers a value of about $22.10 (1,300 x $0.017 = $22.10).

This doesn’t seem like a whole lot more. Yet it can add up for Globalist members if they have a lot of stays, especially if they’re more expensive stays.

FAQs

Can you use Hyatt points to upgrade your room?

Yes, Hyatt points can be used to upgrade your room, starting from 3,000 points per night to upgrade to a Regency Club or Grand Club room. It’s 6,000 points per night for a standard suite upgrade, and 9,000 points for a premium suite upgrade.

Is World of Hyatt elite status worth it?

If you often stay at Hyatt properties, it could be well worth it to have World of Hyatt elite status. The top-tier status is Globalist, which offers late checkout (4:00 p.m.), club lounge access or free breakfast, free parking on award nights, and potential room upgrades (including standard suites). These perks could offer you loads of value if you travel frequently enough.

How much is 25,000 Hyatt points worth?

According to accepted points valuations, 25,000 Hyatt points would be worth at least $425. However, this value could be lower or higher depending on how you use your points. The most value for Hyatt points typically comes from redeeming them for award stays at Hyatt properties.


Bottom line

It’s important to understand how the various loyalty programs, including Marriott Bonvoy and Hilton Honors, work if you want to get as much value as you can out of them. With the World of Hyatt program, it’s typically easy to understand how to use your points for free nights and suite upgrades — which helps improve the overall experience for Hyatt guests.

As you make plans to stay at Hyatt properties, remember to use the available options for earning Hyatt points to your advantage. Certain credit cards provide a straightforward way for you to earn valuable points on purchases you could be making every day.

Big bonus points on Hyatt stays

Intro Offer

Earn up to 60,000 points: 30,000 points after spending $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months, plus an additional 30,000 points by earning 2 bonus points per $1 spent on purchases that earn 1 bonus point, up to $15,000 spent in the first 6 months

Annual Fee

$95

Rewards Rate

9X points per $1 spent at Hyatt hotels; 2X points per $1 spent on eligible travel, dining, and health purchases; and 1 point per $1 spent on everything else

Benefits and Drawbacks

Benefits

  • Up to 60,000 point sign-up bonus
  • Up to 9X points per $1 spent on Hyatt stays
  • 1 free night every year
  • Automatic elite status

Drawbacks

  • $95 annual fee
  • Lacks some perks of costlier hotel cards
  • No intro 0% APR on purchases or balance transfers
Card Details
  • Earn up to 60,000 points: 30,000 points after spending $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months, plus an additional 30,000 points by earning 2 bonus points per $1 spent on purchases that earn 1 bonus point, up to $15,000 spent in the first 6 months
  • 9X points per $1 spent at Hyatt hotels; 2X points per $1 spent on eligible travel, dining, and health purchases; and 1 point per $1 spent on everything else

Author Details

Ben Walker Ben Walker is a credit cards and travel writer at FinanceBuzz who loves helping others achieve their travel goals through financially-sound decisions. For nearly a decade, he has been using credit card points and miles for the sole purpose of traveling the world. Ben has been featured in The Washington Post, MSN, Debt.com, and Finder.com.